New Chapter in German-African partnership

The German cabinet decided on May 21 on the new Federal Government Policy Guidelines for Africa drafted by the German Foreign Office. The guidelines summarise the context, principles and focuses of Germany’s Africa policy.

Harbour in Luanda Enlarge image Harbour in Luanda (© dpa/picture alliance) These new guidelines show the German Government recognising the rapid changes taking place in Africa and the continent’s new position in the world. There are many different positive developments across the continent, but challenges remain as well. At the same time, our African partners and the international community as a whole are expecting more of Germany.

Making our instruments dovetail better
The German Government therefore wishes to take a comprehensive approach to Africa policy that pays due consideration to the opportunities as well as the risks inherent in collaboration. Germany’s endeavours are to be tailored to suit individual countries and regions and set priorities for cooperation.

There is to be even better dovetailing between the work of the various ministries – such as humanitarian assistance from the Federal Foreign Office, development projects backed by the Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development and support for peace missions provided by the Federal Ministry of Defence. For example Foreign Minister Steinmeier pledged an additional six million Euro in humanitarian aid for South Sudan on 20 May.

Supporting positive developments

Viewing the AU building which was financed by Germany Enlarge image Viewing the AU building which was financed by Germany (© Photothek/Gottschalk) However, this will not prevent Germany from also providing vital capabilities to European and other international missions. Support is currently going to the European Union and United Nations missions in Mali, EUTM and MINUSMA; the EU’s Operation Atalanta to combat piracy off the Horn of Africa; and the UN mission in South Sudan, UNMISS. The new policy guidelines are the product of an extensive consultation process which the Federal Foreign Office launched at the start of this year. They replace the previous Strategy for Africa adopted in 2011 by the last German Government. The new guidelines aim to create even better dovetailing between the work of the individual ministries, so that they can respond more quickly, decisively and effectively than before.

Boosting African ownership

The underlying objectives of the new strategy are to boost African ownership and regional integration as well as to provide support on good governance, the rule of law, economic development and crisis prevention. Foreign Minister Steinmeier used his Africa trip in March 2014 to find out about Africa’s security architecture and progress made on developing African peace and security capabilities. Germany intends to actively support African training institutions by providing military and police training personnel and, for example, helping set up an African Union police unit.

Participating in peace missions

Bundeswehr in Mali Enlarge image (© picture alliance/dpa) However, this will not prevent Germany from also providing vital capabilities to European and other international missions. Support is currently going to the European Union and United Nations missions in Mali, EUTM and MINUSMA; the EU’s Operation Atalanta to combat piracy off the Horn of Africa; and the UN mission in Souh Sudan, UNMISS.The new policy guidelines are the product of an extensive consultation process which the Federal Foreign Office launched at the start of this year. They replace the previous Strategy for Africa adopted in 2011 by the last German Government. The new guidelines aim to create even better dovetailing between the work of the individual ministries, so that they can respond more quickly, decisively and effectively than before.

May 21, 2014

© FFO

Germany's Africa policy

Africa

Germany's Africa policy

Africa

The German cabinet decided on May 21, 2014 on the new Federal Government Policy Guidelines for Africa drafted by the German Foreign Office. The guidelines summarise the context, principles and focuses of Germany’s Africa policy. These new guidelines show the German Government recognising the rapid changes taking place in Africa and the continent’s new position in the world.